Weekend Reading

The York Minster
The York "Minster" - Creative Commons (Steve nova)

• A couple of ancient and medieval tidbits from The History Blog: French archeologists working at Egypt’s Karnak temple complex found a doorjamb dating back to the 17th Dynasty (ca. 1634-1534 BC), with the name of Senakht-en-Re, the first written confirmation of that pharaoh’s existence.

• …and while excavating underneath the Gothic cathedral at York, England, archeologists discovered human remains dating back as far as the 12th century, to the time of the Norman cathedral at York (where there’s been a cathedral of some sort since the 7th century).

• Did you know that 1 out of every 200 men on the planet is related to Genghis Khan? The remarkable genetic legacy of the Mongolian Empire, plus its connection to Nazism, courtesy of poet and naturalist Diane Ackerman.

• The six-hundred year history of the Roma, one of the migratory peoples known in Europe as “Gypsies.” (H/T Ralph Luker)

• And while we’re at it… Thanks to Ralph and the other pioneers at Cliopatria, the trailblazing history group blog that said farewell this week.

• Wheaton professor Tim Larsen considers Niall Ferguson’s claim that “the West” constituted the greatest civilization ever built.

• Not content to rest on their laurels as the first “Blog of the Month” to be featured here, the Smithsonian writers at Past Imperfect kept rolling with the story of the 1908 auto race that took competitors 22,000 miles from New York west across North America, Asia, and Europe to Paris.

Using comics as primary sources for historical research! (H/T ProfHacker)

• American Historical Association president William Cronon (previously featured here for his comments about Wikipedia) encourages history professors to recognize high school teachers, museum curators, documentarians, website producers, and popular history writers as fellow “professional historians.”

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