It’s hard to think too far ahead when we’re all still trying to figure out how to finish the spring semester online, but now that we’re into April it is time for our students to start making plans for Fall 2020. So we thought we’d spend some time before the Easter break previewing a few of our fall courses. We’ll start with one of Prof. Poppinga’s:

HIS/POS356 Modern Middle East

Days/Times: MWF 9:00-10:10 in Fall 2020

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing

Counts for:

• Major option: History (global history option or elective); Political Science (comparative politics option or elective); International Relations (Political Science or History option); Business & Political Science (comparative politics option); Social Studies Education (content area elective); Digital Humanities (Humanities core elective); Reconciliation Studies (identity, systems & reconciliation option)

• Minor option: History, Political Science, Reconciliation Studies

Read more about Prof. Poppinga and her commitment to interfaith dialogue in her recent Clarion profile
COMPLETE THE SENTENCE: STUDENTS SHOULD CONSIDER TAKING THIS COURSE ____________.

…because it covers the little known, but vital history of a part of the world that we often overlook. It is the only course that centers on the MENA (Middle East/North Africa) and covers the region in depth.

WHAT’S A BIG QUESTION THAT YOU’RE ASKING IN THIS COURSE?

How do we engage and reconcile U.S. involvement in the Middle East now, in the past and in the future? How do we determine “obligation” and “responsibility” when it comes to other societies?

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE READING, FILM, OR OTHER SOURCE TO TEACH IN THIS COURSE?

Our unit on the history of the conflict in Israel and Palestine. It’s a crucial, ongoing history that I think needs to be examined and studied by Christians, in particular.

The Cathedral of St. James in the Armenian quarter of Jerusalem – Creative Commons (Pablo Gonzalez)
WHICH HISTORICAL INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP ARE YOU MOST EXCITED FOR STUDENTS TO MEET IN THIS COURSE?

Before teaching Modern Middle East, I never knew anything about Armenian history or culture. I love that we get to explore one of the oldest, yet little known, enduring Christian communities in this course.

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